Remember to communicate clearly to inform customers

Though it is important to communicate clearly with your customers at all times,  now it is more important than ever, as businesses prepare to re-open as lockdown eases.

Why do you need to communicate clearly after disruption?

After any period of disruption for a business, customers are likely to be wondering about what might be different next time they visit you. This issue has become very significant for the new normal which will resume post-lockdown.  Your customers’  need for your product/service at present has been overtaken by their primary need for information to answer their queries. I’m illustrating this instalment with a tomato plant because tomatoes are able to communicate clearly. An experienced gardener will know how important it is to watch the plant’s leaves, which communicate the plant’s needs. Here’s how they do it and tips for you to follow which have been used this week by my client Daily Bread Cafe, TN4:

Tomato Tips – Ways to Communicate Clearly

  1. Physical signs – tomatoes show what they need  by changing shape.  Curled leaves mean that they require a more steady temperature.  They thrive best in a greenhouse. Mottled leaves indicate lack of nutrients from poor soil.
  2. Extend your reach – healthy plants produce vigorous lateral shoots which indicate that additional space is needed for it to continue to grow.  The Daily Bread was able to clearly communicate, so that its details were captured by a local blogger for her newsletter, thus extending the reach of its message. You can see how it appeared on that bloggers site

When you communicate your message clearly, you’re more likely to attract support from others. With shares and retweets, you reach more people.

You can use physical signs too. The Daily Bread is using a blackboard to direct its take-away customers to its new one-way system which maintains social distancing.  Many firms will need to use new signage.  Here are the recommendations from Tunbridge Wells Borough Council for our town.